IELTS success!

IELTS success!
In recent months I have been helping some students to prepare for the IELTS test. Institutions of higher education, such as universities, in English-speaking countries require non-native English speakers to reach a minimum standard of English in an IELTS test (or a TOEFL test) as proof of their ability to be able to study successfully in English. The minimum score required varies from institution to institution but as a general guide, most British universities require a minimum IELTS score of 6.5 (considered the start of advanced level) whereas many US colleges require an IELTS score of 5.5 (upper-intermediate level).
Last June a student (who I will call Y-san and who kindly gave me permission to write about his progress in this blog) came to my school with hopes of studying in the UK. During his placement test interview it was clear that his English speaking and listening skills were at a solid intermediate level, i.e. he could maintain a conversation on general topics fairly well with few errors so I knew he had a realistic chance of achieving an IELTS score of 5.5 after a short period of relevant practice at my school.
Here is a summary of his progress during the 7 months (56 hours of tutorials) he studied with us:
IELTS Test One
(Taken after two months/16 hours of IELTS practice at the Windmill English Centre)
Aug 28th 2012 Listening 4.5  Reading 6.0  Speaking 5.5  Writing 4.0   Total 5.0
IELTS Test Two
(Taken after four months/32 hours of IELTS practice at the Windmill English Centre)
Oct 30th 2012 Listening 6.0  Reading 6.0  Speaking 6.0  Writing 4.5   Total 5.5
IELTS Test Three
(Taken after seven months/56 hours of IELTS practice at the Windmill English Centre)
Aug 28th 2012 Listening 6.0  Reading 6.0  Speaking 6.5  Writing 5.0   Total 6.0
We were all very pleased that he made steady progress improving his IELTS scores. When he achieved a score of 5.5 in October 30th, he was able to apply to study at US colleges. It is interesting to see that his lowest scores were for writing. In the writing test, candidates have to write a brief report of 150 words and a short essay of 250 words. However, Y-san had never written a report or an essay in English before coming to my school. It seems that actually producing English, whether in written or spoken form, is not widely practised by students in junior high and high schools in Japan. According to Y-san, his ability to speak reasonable English resulted mainly from the speaking practice he had during his home stay experiences in the US and Sweden and his interest in making friends with foreigners while a student in Tokyo.
Anyway, everyone at the WEC would like to wish him all the best in his future studies.
For more information about IELTS examinations and preparation for them, please feel free to contact us at the Windmill English Centre.
ielts

In recent months I have been helping some students to prepare for the IELTS test. Institutions of higher education, such as universities, in English-speaking countries require non-native English speakers to reach a minimum standard of English in an IELTS test (or a TOEFL test) as proof of their ability to be able to study successfully in English. The minimum score required varies from institution to institution but as a general guide, most British universities require a minimum IELTS score of 6.5 (considered the start of advanced level) whereas many US colleges require an IELTS score of 5.5 (upper-intermediate level).

Last June a student (who I will call Y-san and who kindly gave me permission to write about his progress in this blog) came to my school with hopes of studying in the UK. During his placement test interview it was clear that his English speaking and listening skills were at a solid intermediate level, i.e. he could maintain a conversation on general topics fairly well with few errors so I knew he had a realistic chance of achieving an IELTS score of 5.5 after a short period of relevant practice at my school.

Here is a summary of his progress during the 7 months (56 hours of tutorials) he studied with us:

IELTS Test One
(Taken after two months/16 hours of IELTS practice at the Windmill English Centre)
Aug 28th 2012 Listening 4.5  Reading 6.0  Speaking 5.5  Writing 4.0   Total 5.0
IELTS Test Two
(Taken after four months/32 hours of IELTS practice at the Windmill English Centre)
Oct 30th 2012 Listening 6.0  Reading 6.0  Speaking 6.0  Writing 4.5   Total 5.5
IELTS Test Three
(Taken after seven months/56 hours of IELTS practice at the Windmill English Centre)
Aug 28th 2012 Listening 6.0  Reading 6.0  Speaking 6.5  Writing 5.0   Total 6.0

We were all very pleased that he made steady progress improving his IELTS scores. When he achieved a score of 5.5 in October 30th, he was able to apply to study at US colleges. It is interesting to see that his lowest scores were for writing. In the writing test, candidates have to write a brief report of 150 words and a short essay of 250 words. However, Y-san had never written a report or an essay in English before coming to my school. It seems that actually producing English, whether in written or spoken form, is not widely practised by students in junior high and high schools in Japan. According to Y-san, his ability to speak reasonable English resulted mainly from the speaking practice he had during his home stay experiences in the US and Sweden and his interest in making friends with foreigners while a student in Tokyo.

Anyway, everyone at the WEC would like to wish him all the best in his future studies.

For more information about IELTS examinations and preparation for them, please feel free to contact us at the Windmill English Centre.

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